You are here

Blog

Celebrating 20 Years in Business: 20 Questions for Marc Gagnier

Marc Gagnier, CEO Marc Gagnier, PainfulPleasures

Read in English Leer en Español


20 Questions for 20 Years with Marc Gagnier

1. When did you discover a passion for business?

In 7th grade, I was in a Giant grocery store with my dad and I saw a 5-pack of Bubble Yum in the candy aisle for $1.00. I knew that if I bought this, I could sell each pack for $0.50 and make a cool $1.50 profit when all was sold. That next morning, I sold out before school even started. From that moment on, my candy empire grew.

 

2. How did you expand your candy empire?

I started to sell bubblegum, single Twizzlers, Blow Pops, Jolly Ranchers, candy bars — whatever I could buy in bulk, I would turn around and sell it to my classmates. I upgraded my backpack to hold more products. I was carrying three backpacks to school loaded with candy bars, gum, soda, etc.

I would put 36 to 48 cans of soda in the freezer every night between 12–1am, so that when I woke up at 6 or 6:30 to head to school, they would be super cold but not 100% frozen. [That way], they could stay cold for most of the school day. By 12th grade, I was making close to $100 a day in cash.

 

3. What was your first experience with body modification?

Between 7th and 8th grade, I pierced my ear with a sewing needle. I remember taking a lighter, burning the tip of the needle, sticking an ice cube on my ear, and slowly pushing the needle through. Probably took me an hour to get that needle in with all the breaks I would take between each push. When I started high school, I think I had two holes in my ear.

 

Marc Gagnier, CEO PainfulPleasures, Marc Close-up

 

4. Did you get any more piercings?

I graduated high school in 1995 and went to college with only two holes in my ear. That summer before college, my brother and I got our belly buttons pierced, following in the footsteps of our sister, Michelle. While I was in college trying out for the men’s soccer team, I drove down to Fells Point in Baltimore city and got my tongue pierced. Not the smartest move, as my tongue was swollen; it was hard to eat and we had three sessions a day for tryouts for the team. Surprisingly, I made the team.

That winter, I worked at a local ski resort as a snowboard instructor. One of my bosses, Jason Nightingale, was a piercer at the time. One night after teaching at the resort, my brother and I followed Jason to the shop he was working at. He pierced one nipple each on both of us. I remember taking off my shirt and standing up against the piercing room wall, him marking everything, and then the needle went through. [It was] the most painful thing I had ever experienced at the time.

My brother and I drove home that night with the windows down in the middle of winter, shirts off, and no seat belts on so that we could try to numb the pain we were both going through. I believe by the time I was done with college, I had 17–19 piercings.

 

5. Where did you get your body jewelry?

With that many holes, the cost of jewelry at the time was fairly expensive and hard to come by. The internet was still fairly new. I found a couple of different suppliers in the USA, started to purchase jewelry from them directly, and started to resell what I was buying.

 

6. Did you continue doing piercings on yourself or any others?

I believe I started to pierce around 1997-1998 while I was in college; I started to pierce friends and family from about 1998–2004. Coming from a fairly big family — three sisters, one brother, and three step sisters, with me being the oldest — everyone in my family was interested in getting something pierced.

 

7. When did you start selling body jewelry and other supplies online?

Originally, I was calling my company “Sideshowstyles” after my nickname in college. My soccer team thought I looked like Sideshow Bob, with the dreadlocks and tons of piercings, so the nickname stuck. [Online sales were] just a hobby [...] I added more and more [products], and people started to shop and buy. I started to buy in bulk, stock the stuff in my townhouse, and did this at night. I was working anywhere from 2–8 jobs at a time from 1999 'til about 2004. In 2004, I quit all my other jobs to start doing PainfulPleasures full-time. [Quoted from September 21, 2010]

 

painful pleasures stock, bins, startup, townhouse

 

8. Who were your first customers?

Mystic Piercing & Tattoo in Crofton, Maryland was my first wholesale customer in either late 2000 or early 2001. I remember I went in there and they bought some stuff; I was so excited [that] I went next door and bought a pizza from Pizza Boli’s to celebrate. That became my routine for a couple of years.

 

9. How long did it take before you moved to a warehouse?

We started to look at warehouse spaces in 2004 and decided on a new building that was going up. The complex that was being built was a 28-unit warehouse condominium — meaning there are a total of 28 different units for sale or available in this warehouse complex. We put down the money in 2005 for an end unit and settled on March 6th, 2006.

 

10. What were those early days like?

We had no idea what we were doing.

Mind you, everything up to this point was being run out of my townhouse. We hired a company that was supposed to build out the space for us, as we basically only bought a shell. This company was supposed to install the HVAC, electrical, offices, internet etc.

The building was actually completed in 2006, but the company we hired really screwed us. They didn't finish the job, kept delaying and delaying, and [finally] I said, “F--- it. As long as we have internet and electricity, we can move.” We were busting out of the seams at the townhouse. [In fact], the five of us were worried the townhouse might collapse or the floors would break through, because of the amount of jewelry we had in there.

With the internet and electricity hooked up, we moved in November of 2007. So, [it was] the five of us: Michelle [my sister and present-day PainfulPleasures Human Resources rep], Michael (my brother), Matt (my cousin), Molly (my stepsister), Rob (a friend from high school), and I  were working on organizing the new warehouse and filling orders at the beginning of winter. For that entire winter, we had no heat. We had these little propane heat burners that we would gather around to try and get warm.

 

painful pleasures warehouse, warehouse construction

 

11. When did you realize you needed more space?

Before we ever moved into Unit 214 [the end unit], we quickly realized this was not big enough. We were growing so fast and accumulating so much product that we needed another spot. Luckily, Unit 107 was for sale, and I ended up purchasing that six months later on September 20th, 2006.

As we grew, we filled this space up, too. I bought Unit 108 next on March 28th, 2007. I realized that Units 108 and 107 were not going to be big enough, and I asked my neighbor who was in Unit 106 if he was interested in selling his space. We bought Unit 106 on June 4th, 2008.

We were operating and filling orders out of Unit 214 and then stocking products in the three connecting units below us.

 

PainfulPleasures, PainfulPleasures Warehouse, PainfulPleasures Workplace

 

12. What was your vision for PainfulPleasures when the idea was first conceived?

To be a one-stop shop for piercers; then, eventually for tattoo artists; and then for tattoo shops as a whole.

 

13. How has your vision changed?

[I still have] the same vision: offer artists/shops the ability to get everything they need from one place.

 

14. How was the PainfulPleasures mission born?

I was so frustrated when I was piercing. Everyone was out of stock of product, no one ever had any inventory, and I had to purchase all my supplies from multiple vendors. My mission was to be a one-stop shop.

 

PainfulPleasures Warehouse, PainfulPleasures Workplace, PainfulPleasures, Work

 

15. What attracted you to the tattoo and piercing industry?

Growing up, I always felt I didn't belong. I played sports — soccer, lacrosse, basketball, baseball, ice hockey — but I didn't really connect with the guys on my team. My hair was always different and I was into different things. Going to college gave me that freedom [to explore]. I always liked to try different things.

 

16. Where do you see PainfulPleasures 20 years from today?

Being the leader in the tattoo and piercing industry.

 

17. What is your favorite memory at PainfulPleasures to date?

The day we moved into the first warehouse #214. That night I slept on the concrete floor and wrapped myself in newspaper and shipping supplies to stay warm. I was so nervous, excited, and scared that I didn't want to leave, as we had so much work to do and wanted to make sure we were up and running with as little down time as possible.

 

18. What one goal are you most proud of PainfulPleasures (and yourself) for accomplishing?

Continuing to grow and staying focused on the industry. So many of our competitors have come and gone. They focus on the “get rich” [aspect] and don't reinvest back into the company or its employees.

 

MilkCrate, MilkCrate Creative Suite, PainfulPleasures, PainfulPleasures Work

 

19. What’s one big goal you have for the future?

Continue to streamline our operations and bring new and exciting products to the industry.

 

20. What is your advice for any entrepreneur looking to make a difference in a competitive world?

It is much harder than most people think. The first eight years of my life [as a business man] are kind of a blur: working 20 hour days, being millions of dollars in debt, learning everything as I was doing it, etc. Don’t [start a business] if you think it’s going to be all fun and games. Tons of sacrifices will have to be made.

 

marc gagnier, painful pleasures ceo


20 Preguntas por 20 Años con Marc Gagnier

Marc Gagnier, CEO Marc Gagnier, PainfulPleasures

1. Cuándo descubriste la pasión por los negocios?

En 7° grado, estaba en un almacén enorme con mi papá y vi en un sector de dulces un paquete de 5 gomas de mascar por $1.00 Sabía que si lo compraba podía vender cada una por $0.50 y hacer una linda ganancia de $1.50. A la mañana siguiente, vendí todo antes de que comiencen las clases. Desde ese preciso momento comenzó mi imperio de dulces.

 

2. Cómo expandiste tu imperio de dulces?

Comencé a vender dulces, gomas de mascar y refrescos - cualquier cosa que pueda comprar en volumen, me arreglaba para vendérselo a mis compañeros de clase. Todo lo que podía comprar en volumen, lo revendía en la escuela. Compré una mochila más grande para que entren más productos. Llevaba tres mochilas llenas de dulces, gomas de mascar, refrescos, etc.

Cada noche entre las 12 y 1AM ponía en el congelador entre 36 y 48 latas de gaseosa, así cuando me despertaba a las 6 o 6:30 para ir a clases, iban a estar súper frías, pero no congeladas. Así se mantendrían frías por varias horas. Ya en 12° grado hacía cerca de $100 por día en efectivo.

 

3. Cuál fue tu primera experiencia con la modificación corporal?

Entre 7° y 8° grado, me perforé la oreja con una aguja de coser. Recuerdo tomar un encendedor, quemar la punta de la aguja, apoyar un cubo de hielo en mi lóbulo y empujar la aguja lentamente. Probablemente me tomó una hora pasar la aguja entre todos los intentos. Cuando empecé la secundaria creo que tenía dos perforaciones en mis oídos

 

Marc Gagnier, CEO PainfulPleasures, Marc Close-up

 

4. Cómo te agregaste más piercings?

Me gradué del colegio en 1995 y fui a la universidad con dos agujeros en mi oreja. Ese verano, antes de la universidad, mi hermano y yo nos perforamos el ombligo, siguiendo los pasos de mi hermana Michelle. Mientras estaba en la universidad entrenando para ingresar al equipo de fútbol, fui hasta Fells Point en Baltimore y me perforé la lengua. No fue la jugada más inteligente ya que mi lengua estaba muy hinchada; me costaba comer y teníamos tres turnos de entrenamiento por día para tratar de ingresar. Increíblemente logré quedar dentro del equipo.

Ese invierno trabajé en un centro de esquí local como instructor de snowboard. Uno de mis jefes, Jason Nightingale, era a la vez perforador. Una noche luego de trabajar en el centro de esquí mi hermano y yo fuimos al estudio donde trabajaba Jason. Nos perforó un pezón a cada uno. Recuerdo sacarme la camiseta y apoyarme en la pared de la sala de piercing; él haciendo las marcas y la aguja simplemente pasó. Fue la experiencia más dolorosa que viví hasta ese momento.

Esa noche, mi hermano y yo manejamos con las ventanas abiertas en pleno invierno, sin camiseta y sin cinturón de seguridad para tratar de adormecer un poco el dolor por el que estábamos pasando. Creo que para cuando terminé la Universidad tenía entre 17 y 19 perforaciones

 

5. Dónde conseguías tu joyería?

Con tantas perforaciones, el costo de la joyería era bastante alto y también era difícil de conseguir. Internet era bastante nuevo. Encontré un par de proveedores en EEUU, comencé a comprar joyería directamente de ellos, y empecé a revender lo que compraba.

 

6. Continuaste perforándote o perforando a otras personas?

Creo que empecé a perforar entre el 97´ y el 98´ mientras iba a la universidad; empecé a perforar a amigos y familiares desde aproximadamente 1998 al 2004. Viniendo de una familia bastante grande (tres hermanas, un hermano y tres hermanastras), siendo yo el mayor, todos en la familia querían que les perfore algo en algún lugar.

 

7. Cuándo comenzaste a vender joyería y otros insumos online?

Originalmente nombré a mi compañía “Sideshowstyles”, eso se relacionaba con mi apodo en la universidad. Mis compañeros del equipo de fútbol pensaban que me parecía a Sideshow Bob ( Bob Patiño, de los Simpson), con mis dreadlocks y los piercings. Así que ese apodo quedó. Las ventas online eran un hobby, yo iba agregando más y más productos y los clientes empezaban a ingresar y comprar. Comencé a comprar en volumen, guardar el stock en mi casa, y preparaba los pedidos de noche. Llegué a tener hasta 8 trabajos a la vez desde 1999 hasta el 2004. Fue en ese año que renuncié a todos mis empleos para empezar a hacer PainfulPleasures a tiempo completo. (cita del 21 de Septiembre de 2010)

 

painful pleasures stock, bins, startup, townhouse

 

8. Quiénes fueron tus primeros clientes?

Mystic Piercing & Tattoo en Crofton, Maryland, fue mi primer cliente mayorista hacia finales del 2000, principios del 2001. Me acuerdo de que fui y me compraron mercadería; estaba tan contento que salí a la tienda contigua y me compré una pizza en Pizza Boli´s para celebrar. Esa se convirtió en mi rutina por los próximos años.

 

9. Cuánto tiempo tomó hasta que te mudaste a un almacén?

Empezamos a buscar entre galpones y almacenes en 2004 y nos decidimos por una nueva construcción que se estaba desarrollando. El complejo que estaba siendo construido era un condominio de 28 naves, quiere decir que tiene 28 diferentes unidades a la venta o disponibles. Pusimos el dinero en 2005 por una unidad y nos establecimos el 6 de marzo de 2006

 

10. Cómo eran esos días?

No teníamos idea de lo que estábamos haciendo.

Quiero decir, hasta este punto, todo lo que se hacía era desde mi casa. Contratamos a una compañía que supuestamente iba a construirnos el interior, ya que solo compramos la parte de obra civil. Esta compañía debería instalar la ventilación, calefacción y aires acondicionados; la electricidad, oficinas, internet, etc.

La construcción fue terminada en 2006 pero esta compañía realmente nos estafó. No terminaron el trabajo, solo demoraban las cosas más y más, hasta que finalmente dije ¨ A la Mi***a todos, mientras tengamos internet y electricidad nos podemos mudar¨. Ya no dábamos más abasto en mi departamento, de hecho, los cinco que trabajábamos teníamos miedo de que los pisos colapsen de tanta cantidad de joyería que teníamos.

Con internet y la electricidad conectados, nos mudamos en noviembre de 2007. Así que éramos cinco: Michelle (mi hermana, actualmente Directora de Recursos Humanos en PainfulPleasures), Michael (mi hermano), Matt (mi primo), Molly (mi hermanastra), Rob (un amigo del colegio) y yo. Estábamos trabajando y organizando el nuevo depósito y preparando pedidos al comienzo del invierno. Durante todo ese invierno no tuvimos calefacción. Teníamos pequeños calentadores a gas y los íbamos moviendo por donde teníamos que estar preparando los pedidos.

 

painful pleasures warehouse, warehouse construction

 

11. Cuando te diste cuenta de que necesitabas más espacio?

Antes de mudarnos a la unidad 214 (la de la esquina) inmediatamente nos dimos cuenta de que no era lo suficientemente grande. Crecíamos tan rápido y acumulábamos tantos productos que necesitamos otra unidad, y terminé comprando otra por septiembre del 2006.

Mientras crecíamos, llenamos este nuevo espacio. Compré la nave de al lado, y luego nos dimos cuenta de que dos unidades seguidas no iban a ser suficiente tampoco, así que le pregunté a mi vecino si me vendía la suya. La compramos en junio de 2008.

Operábamos y preparábamos los pedidos en la unidad 214 y teníamos todo el stock en las otras tres unidades contiguas que se encuentran del otro lado del edificio.

 

PainfulPleasures, PainfulPleasures Warehouse, PainfulPleasures Workplace

 

12. Cuál era tu vision para PainfulPleasures cuando lo creaste?

Ser un one-stop shop (una parada única para comprar) para los perforadores. Luego para los tatuadores y los estudios en general.

 

13. Cómo cambió tu visión?

Todavía tengo la misma visión: ofrecer a artistas y estudios la posibilidad de comprar todo en en solo lugar

 

14. Cómo nació la misión de PainfulPleasures?

Estaba tan frustrado cuando peforaba... Nadie tenía stock, ni inventarios, y tenia que andar comprando mis cosas de diferentes proveedores. Mi misión era ser un único lugar para comprar.

 

PainfulPleasures Warehouse, PainfulPleasures Workplace, PainfulPleasures, Work

 

15. Qué te atrajo a la industria del tatuaje y los piericngs?

Nunca sentí que pertenecía a ningún grupo. Jugué al fútbol, lacrosse, basketball, baseball, hockey sobre hielo, pero nunca llegaba a conectarme con mis compañeros. Ir a la universidad me dio la libertad de experimentar. Siempre me gustó probar con cosas diferentes o nuevas.

 

16. Dónde ves a PainfulPleasures en los próximos 20 años?

Ser el líder de la industria del tatuaje y del piercing.

 

17. Cuál es tu mejor recuerdo en PainfulPleasures?

El día que nos mudamos al primer almacén, la #214. Esa noche dormí en el piso y me tapé con papel de diario y materiales de embalaje para mantenerme caliente. Estaba tan nervioso, excitado y con miedo a la vez que no me quería ir, ya que teníamos mucho trabajo y quería asegurarme que no íbamos a perder ni un solo minuto.

 

18. Qué objetivo de PainfulPleasures y también tuyo te enorgullece haber conseguido?

Seguir creciendo y mantenernos enfocados en la industria. Vi aparecer y desaparecer a muchos competidores. Se enfocan más en volverse ricos y no reinvierten en la compañía ni en los empleados.

 

MilkCrate, MilkCrate Creative Suite, PainfulPleasures, PainfulPleasures Work

 

19. Qué gran objetivo tienes para el futuro?

Continuar en la misma línea y traer nuevos y mejores productos a la industria

 

20. Qué consejo le das a un emprendedor que quiere hacer algo diferente en este mundo tan competitivo?

Es mucho más difícil de lo que la gente piensa. Los primeros años con la empresa fueron muy turbios: trabajaba 20 horas al día, debía millones de dólares, iba aprendiendo a medida que hacía las cosas, etc. No empiecen un negocio si piensan que va a ser todo diversión y juegos. Hay que hacer muchísimos sacrificios

 

marc gagnier, painful pleasures ceo